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What Fish Can Live With Red Eared Slider Turtles

What Fish Can Live With Red Eared Slider Turtles

Red Eared Slider Turtles are popular pets due to their vibrant appearance and relatively low maintenance. However, many turtle owners wonder if they can add fish to their turtle’s tank to create a more dynamic and visually appealing environment. In this article, we will explore the compatibility of different fish species with Red Eared Slider Turtles, considering factors such as tank size, water conditions, and the behavior of both the turtles and the fish.

Factors to Consider

Before introducing fish to a Red Eared Slider Turtle tank, it is crucial to consider several factors to ensure the well-being of both the turtles and the fish:

  • Tank Size: Red Eared Slider Turtles require a large tank to thrive, as they can grow up to 12 inches in length. The tank should provide ample swimming space for both the turtles and the fish.
  • Water Conditions: Turtles prefer warm water with a temperature range of 75-85°F (24-29°C). However, some fish species may have different temperature requirements, so it is essential to choose fish that can tolerate the same water conditions as the turtles.
  • Compatibility: Not all fish species are compatible with Red Eared Slider Turtles. Some fish may be aggressive and nip at the turtles’ fins, while others may become prey for the turtles. It is crucial to select fish species that can coexist peacefully with the turtles.
  • Feeding Habits: Red Eared Slider Turtles are omnivorous and may eat small fish. Therefore, it is important to choose fish species that are not small enough to be considered prey by the turtles.

Fish Species Compatible with Red Eared Slider Turtles

While not all fish species are suitable tank mates for Red Eared Slider Turtles, there are several options that can coexist peacefully. Here are some fish species that are known to be compatible:

1. Rosy Red Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

Rosy Red Minnows are a popular choice for turtle tanks due to their hardiness and peaceful nature. They can tolerate a wide range of water conditions and are not aggressive towards turtles. These small fish can add movement and color to the tank, creating a visually appealing environment.

2. Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

Goldfish are another common choice for turtle tanks. They come in various colors and shapes, adding visual interest to the tank. However, it is important to note that fancy goldfish with long, flowing fins may be more susceptible to fin nipping by turtles. Therefore, it is recommended to choose hardier varieties, such as the common goldfish.

3. White Cloud Mountain Minnows (Tanichthys albonubes)

White Cloud Mountain Minnows are small, peaceful fish that can tolerate cooler water temperatures. They are known for their vibrant colors and active swimming behavior. These fish can coexist well with Red Eared Slider Turtles as long as the water temperature is within their preferred range.

4. Weather Loaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus)

Weather Loaches, also known as Dojo Loaches, are bottom-dwelling fish that can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. They have a unique appearance with elongated bodies and can add diversity to the tank. These fish are generally peaceful and can coexist with Red Eared Slider Turtles.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

1. Can Red Eared Slider Turtles live with tropical fish?

Yes, Red Eared Slider Turtles can live with tropical fish as long as the water temperature is suitable for both the turtles and the fish. It is important to choose tropical fish species that can tolerate the same water conditions as the turtles.

2. Can Red Eared Slider Turtles eat the fish in their tank?

Red Eared Slider Turtles are omnivorous and may eat small fish. Therefore, it is important to choose fish species that are not small enough to be considered prey by the turtles. Additionally, providing a well-balanced diet for the turtles can reduce the likelihood of them preying on the fish.

3. Do Red Eared Slider Turtles get along with all types of goldfish?

While Red Eared Slider Turtles can generally coexist with goldfish, it is important to choose hardier varieties, such as the common goldfish. Fancy goldfish with long, flowing fins may be more susceptible to fin nipping by turtles.

4. Can Red Eared Slider Turtles live with aggressive fish?

It is not recommended to house Red Eared Slider Turtles with aggressive fish species. Aggressive fish may nip at the turtles’ fins or cause stress, which can negatively impact the turtles’ health. It is crucial to choose peaceful fish species that can coexist peacefully with the turtles.

5. How many fish can I add to a Red Eared Slider Turtle tank?

The number of fish that can be added to a Red Eared Slider Turtle tank depends on the tank size and the compatibility of the fish species. It is important to provide ample swimming space for both the turtles and the fish. Overcrowding the tank can lead to stress and poor water quality. It is recommended to consult a knowledgeable pet store or a veterinarian for guidance on the appropriate number of fish for your specific tank.

6. Can Red Eared Slider Turtles live with other turtle species?

Red Eared Slider Turtles are generally not recommended to be housed with other turtle species. They can be territorial and may exhibit aggressive behavior towards other turtles. It is best to provide each turtle with its own separate tank to ensure their well-being.

Summary

When considering adding fish to a Red Eared Slider Turtle tank, it is important to choose fish species that are compatible with the turtles in terms of tank size, water conditions, and behavior. Rosy Red Minnows, Goldfish, White Cloud Mountain Minnows, and Weather Loaches are some fish species that can coexist peacefully with Red Eared Slider Turtles. It is crucial to provide a suitable environment for both the turtles and the fish to thrive. By considering these factors and following proper care guidelines, you can create a visually appealing and harmonious aquatic habitat for your Red Eared Slider Turtles and their fish tank mates.